Stronger than diamond: scientists have confirmed the properties of a new carbon nanostructure

Stronger than diamond: scientists have confirmed the properties of a new carbon nanostructure

Stronger than diamond: scientists have confirmed the properties of a new carbon nanostructure

Researchers have demonstrated that the new lamellar nanolattice structure has the most high for today indicator of mechanical strength, higher than that of diamond.

Previous attempts by scientists to create a super-strong porous structure were not of particular practical interest, since they did not have the necessary mechanical characteristics. However, engineers at the University of California, Irvine, together with colleagues from other institutions, have developed a new class of nanogratings that are 639% stronger and 522% stiffer than beam structures..

Scientists have suggested that the addition of plates should strengthen the structure and a prototype was created to test this concept using 3D laser printing technology. The use of a UV-sensitive resin allowed them to cure the material at the desired points, and thanks to the movement of the platform in three dimensions, it was possible to assemble cells with plates up to 160 nm thick.

The team removed excess resin through tiny holes in the plates. For this, pyrolysis was used by heating the finished structure in a vacuum chamber to 900 °C for an hour.

Stronger than diamond: scientists have confirmed the properties of a new carbon nanostructure

As a result, the scientists obtained a cube-shaped lattice made of glassy carbon, which has the highest strength that they have ever considered possible for such a porous material (the ratio of strength to density is higher than that of diamond). At the same time, the nanostructure provided the natural mechanical effects of a substance without defects, since such a tiny lattice brings it closer to a theoretical crystal without pores and cracks..

According to researchers, similar materials have potential for use in the construction and aerospace industries because they combine high strength and low density.

Earlier, we also reported on the development of a polymer material from nanotubes, which, in terms of rigidity comparable to diamond.

text: Ilya Bauer, photo: University of California, Irvine, jckonline